Search




Categories: Eat Health

Study links cottonseed oil with lower cholesterol

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men.

The researchers conducted a five-day outpatient feeding trial of 15 healthy, normal weight men to test the effects of diets enriched with cottonseed oil and olive oil on lipid profiles.

Participants showed significant reductions in cholesterol and triglycerides in the cottonseed oil trial compared to minimal changes on the olive oil-enriched diet.

The results appear in the journal Nutrition Research.

“One of the reasons these results were so surprising is because of the magnitude of change observed with the cottonseed oil diet,” said Jamie Cooper, an associate professor in the UGA College of Family and Consumer Sciences’ department of foods and nutrition and the corresponding author of the journal article. “To see this amount of change in such a short period of time is exciting.”

The subjects, all healthy men between the ages of 18 and 45, were provided high-fat meals for five days in two separate, tightly controlled trials, the only difference being the use of either cottonseed oil or olive oil in the meals.

Participants showed an average decrease of 8 percent in total cholesterol on the cottonseed oil diet, along with a 15 percent decrease in low-density lipoprotein, or LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) and a 30 percent decrease in triglycerides.

This diet also increased high-density lipoproteins, or HDL (the “good” cholesterol) by 8 percent.

Researchers suggested a fatty acid unique to cottonseed oil, dihydrosterculic acid, may help prevent the accumulation of triglycerides, a type of fat, in the body.

“By doing that, it pushes the body to burn more of that fat because it can’t store it properly, so you have less lipid and cholesterol accumulation,” Cooper said.

That mechanism, in addition to the high polyunsatured fat and omega-6 content of cottonseed oil, seems to be a key component to the beneficial effects on lipid profiles, Cooper said.

Researchers plan to expand the study to include older adults with high cholesterol as well as a longer feeding intervention.

Source: University of Georgia
Journal: Nutrition Research
Related Journal Article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0271531718307048?via%3Dihub

cheryl

Share
Published by
cheryl
Tags: cholesterol cottonseed oil

Recent Posts

  • Drink
  • Eat
  • Health

Verifying ‘organic’ foods

Organic foods are increasingly popular -- and pricey. Organic fruits and vegetables are grown without synthetic pesticides, and because of…

10 hours ago
  • Eat
  • Health
  • Life

When it comes to food, one size doesn’t fit all: world’s largest scientific nutrition research project reveals even identical twins have different responses to food

The first results were revealed from the largest ongoing scientific nutrition study of its kind today, led by an international…

1 day ago
  • Drink
  • Eat
  • Health
  • Life

Food freshness sensors could replace ‘use-by’ dates to cut food waste

The researchers say the new sensors could help detect spoilage and reduce food waste for supermarkets and consumers. One in…

2 days ago
  • Eat
  • Health

Researchers warn: junk food could be responsible for the food allergy epidemic

Experts at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition are today presenting the…

3 days ago
  • Eat
  • Life

Would you eat genetically modified food if you understood the science behind it?

Jonathon McPhetres, a newly minted PhD in psychology from the University of Rochester, admits he's "personally amazed" what we can…

4 days ago
  • Eat
  • Health

Red and white meats are equally bad for cholesterol

UCSF CHORI study also shows that saturated fats raise low density lipoproteins (LDLs) by the same amount, regardless of meat…

5 days ago